Ireland

Tara Road

t road

Maeve Binchy’s novel Tara Road appeared on Oprah’s Book Club list in 1999. Charles Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities is also on that list, and I know which one I’d rather see adapted for tv and film. (Tom Hiddleston as Sydney Carton and Charles Darnay?!) But Maeve Binchy is a less taxing on the audience and the budget so Tara Road it is.

In typical Lifetime movie of the week fashion, it tells the story of two women who brood over man issues, do something wild, and discover their stronger selves. Irishwoman Ria (Williams) has it all – a husband who looks like Iain Glen, two talented kids, and a plush property. Just when she wants to expand the family, dastardly, duplicitous Danny (Glen) reveals he’s going to leave her for that sexpot from Love Actually (Makatsch).

On the other side of the Atlantic, Marilyn (MacDowell) can’t get over the death of her son from a motorcycle accident. She distances herself from her husband (Zirner) who would rather turn outward to deal with the tragedy. Alienated, alone, trapped by memories of her son, Marilyn does what any woman would do in her situation. She rings up a stranger on the other side of the world and proposes to switch houses with her for a couple months.

Off they go, hoping that new environs will provide some clarity and direction. Each woman is aided by the others’ friends. Ria finds a gaggle of loud and nosy but well-meaning neighbors – they are American, after all – who inject some spontaneity and spirit into her life. Meanwhile, Marilyn eases back into reality through quieter interactions with Ria’s charming friends, including restaurateur Colm, played by Stephen Rea.

And you might be wondering, why is Stephen Rea in this frivolous movie? I suspect if you were a woman who’s loved and lost, you would want his dulcet voice to calm you. He also had the more interesting backstory in Binchy’s novel, but that gets cut, to no ill effect. Another difference for fans of the book is a matter of focus; the movie is better balanced by giving equal screentime to the two stories. At least this way, it’s like two Lifetime movies, and all the feel-good lessons about friendship and self-empowerment, for the price of one. If that’s how you like spending a Saturday evening, this movie’s not a bad deal.

Released: 2005
Prod: Miron Blumental, Noel Pearson, and Sarah Radclyffe
Dir: Gillies MacKinnon
Writer: Cynthia Cidre and Shane Connaughton
Cast: Olivia Williams, Andie MacDowell, Maria Doyle Kennedy, Iain Glen, Stephen Rea, Brenda Fricker, August Zirner, Heike Makatsch, Virginia Cole, Sarah Bolger, Johnny Brennan, Bronagh Gallagher
Time: 97 min
Lang: English
Country: Ireland
Reviewed: 2013

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